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HALL OF MIDTOWN​

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A N D    C A T E R I N G    SE R V I C E S

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CLICK ON LOGO 

 
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HALL @ MIDTOWN​

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The 1.8 million-square-foot complex at the southeast corner of N Dale Mabry Highway and Interstate 275 is projected to open in early 2021

COMING SOON

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The Hall at Midtown, from the Hall on Franklin founder Jamal Wilson, will open with seven new restaurant concepts inside a sprawling mixed-used development early next year.

The 1.8 million-square-foot complex at the southeast corner of N Dale Mabry Highway and Interstate 275 is projected to open in early 2021. The New York-based real estate developer Bromley Companies is behind the $500 million project, which will include office towers, luxury apartments, a dual-branded Aloft and Element hotel, an REI co-op, the Tampa Bay area’s largest Whole Foods Market and multiple restaurants.

 

Two previously announced food hall additions from Wilson include a site in Orlando, set to open later this fall, and the Hall on Central, in St. Petersburg’s EDGE district. An opening date for the St. Pete location has not yet been announced.

The new hall at Midtown Tampa will allow for plenty of outside space and outside dining, one of the attributes that made it an attractive business proposal during the coronavirus pandemic, Wilson said. While the Hall on Franklin has limited sidewalk seating, the new hall will feature a 1,200-square-foot patio space with both an indoor and outdoor bar area. In total, the 8,000-square-foot hall will be able to seat 300 people, making it the largest of all the restaurant concepts at Midtown Tampa so far

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Grant’s Crabs and Seafood

13030 Starkey Road,

Largo, FL 33773

727-584-2722

www.grantscrabs.com

For 8 years, Grant’s Crabs & Seafood has been dedicated to serving quality ingredients and bold flavor in the heart of Tampa Bay. From fresh crab straight out of the waters of sunny Florida, to our finger lickin’ signature “Stuttah Buttah,” a trip to Grant’s is an adventure in deliciousness you will never forget!

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Jerk Hut 

University

1241 East Fowler Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33612
(813) 977-5777

Seminole Heights

1045 East Hillsborough Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33603
(813) 542-5375

South Tampa

4495 West Gandy Boulevard
Tampa, Florida 33611
(813) 835-5375

www..jerkhut.com

Jamaican eats offered cafeteria-style in a low-key, no-frills storefront with outdoor tables.

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Jamaica, the third largest island in the Caribbean features miles of white sand beaches, azure seas, and lush tropical vegetation watered by many rivers. The peaks of the island's famous Blue Mountains reach 7,402 feet above the Caribbean Sea. When Columbus landed on the island in 1492 it was inhabited by tribes of Arawak Indians. The Spanish briefly settled the island but were soon overrun by the British. Plantations flourished throughout the island and Africans, East Indians and Chinese were brought in to tend the crops. Later, the French, Germans and Middle Easterners joined the melting pot. With the arrival of each group, another layer of complexity was added to the cuisine of Jamaica. The Arawak Indians preserved meats by coating it in a complex blend of spicy seasonings and grilling it on a wooden grate over a low smoldering fire. A technique we now call JERK. The Arawak also contributed cassava, bammie and pepper pot to the Jamaican culinary tradition. The Spanish brought plantains, bananas, Seville and Valencia oranges, as well as tamarinds and ginger to the Jamaican table. Jamaican favorites such as Escoviched fish, pea soup, and rice n peas were also introduced by the Spanish. The East Indians brought the curries, roti, and many of the spices that are now an integral part of Jamaican cooking. Out of Africa came okra, yams, and callaloo all staples in the Jamaican diet. The French gave Jamaica solomon gundy, a paté which was used to develop the patty, a worldwide favorite. The Chinese popularized rice and introduced stir frying as a method of cooking. From the British, pickled and salted foods and puddings came to the Jamaican table. The integration of these multinational culinary techniques and traditions with Jamaica's ample supply of tropical produce, fresh seafood, meats and poultry make Jamaican cuisine the intriguing, unique, and delicious adventure that you will enjoy today.

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MAMA SOUL FOOD REST.

3701 E Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.,

Tampa, FL 33610

(813) 769-9552

www.mamassoulfoodrestaurant.com

Welcome to Tampa’s Dining Room for Southern Soul Food

For over 13 years Mama’s Southern Soul Food has been setting the standard for Southern cooking in Tampa, Florida. Business people, celebrities, families and world travelers all dine at Mama’s Southern Soul Food and feel right at home. 

Mama’s focus is on serving made-from-scratch true southern fare served with genuine southern hospitality.

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Owner &

Retired NFL player

Johnny Ray Smith

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JAZZY'S BBQ

TAMPA 

5703 W. Waters Avenue
Tampa, FL 33634-1216

Phone: (813) 243-8872
Fax (813) 243-8753

CLEARWATER

1575 S. Ft. Harrison Avenue
Clearwater, FL 33756

Phone: (727) 223-5955
Fax (727) 223-8957

https://jazzysbbqtampafl.com/

You can smell the aroma of Jazzy’s BBQ from long distances away as you are approaching the restaurant.  The aroma draws many customers in for some of the best BBQ they have ever eaten.

Jazzy’s uses real oak wood, which gives our meat that southern, country barbecue flavor.  If you like real smoked barbecue pork, beef (brisket), chicken, sausage and tasty barbecued ribs smothered in a tangy “homemade” barbecue sauce, then Jazzy’s BBQ is the place for you.

Retired NFL player Johnny Ray Smith, a defensive back for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 1981 to 1984, along with his wife, Pamela, former cheerleader for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, opened Jazzy’s BBQ in October, 1996, naming the restaurant after their daughter, Jasmine.  Jazzy’s is located at the corner of Waters Ave., and Benjamin Rd. east of the Veterans Expressway in the Town-N-Country area of Tampa, Florida.  Jazzy’s has gained a loyal clientele of area industrial and office workers, local residents, as well as receiving customers from the surrounding Tampa Bay area including other surrounding counties

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RUSH HOUR CHICKEN & WAFFLES

ST. PETERSBURG

2140 34th St S,

St. Petersburg, FL 33711

Phone: (727) 440-7817

media@rushhourchickenandwaffles.com

http://www.rushhourchickenandwaffles.com/